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Thread: the amazing president of uruguay
[-] 1 points by Nevada1 (4846) 47 minutes ago

Agree.

Thread: the amazing president of uruguay
[-] 1 points by flip (7101) 50 minutes ago

imagine if we had leaders like that - i would run out to vote faster than than the factless one!

Thread: the amazing president of uruguay
[-] 1 points by Nevada1 (4846) 55 minutes ago

Everyone should see this.

we saw that happen to too many of our generation. pepe hopes you are right!

Thread: The Fear of Equality
[-] 0 points by flip (7101) 1 hour ago

so are you saying that a man with a family of 6 should make the same as a young single person? what you say about money is correct in some ways but not sure how we would run a modern economy without money. that said it is pointless to debate this in detail. we are far off from your utopia. we will have to see where the road takes us - "we build the road as we travel" - no?

Thread: Uruguay Takes On London Bankers, Marlboro Mad Men And TPP
[-] 3 points by johannus (77) from Newburgh, NY 1 hour ago

What an admirable man, Uruguay's President Jose' Mujica is.

But when he says, "The protesters will probably finish up working for multinationals and dying of modern diseases. I hope that I am wrong about that."

I say, 'I believe that you are wrong about that, Pepe'.

Thread: The Fear of Equality
[-] 1 points by donOld (109) 1 hour ago

How about "to each according to their right to live" Our time on Earth is all we have to give. How we use it is the only thing that we have any control over. We didn't choose our intelligence, abilities or good looks. Look beyond the damage that our current system has inflicted on people and give them a little respect. Only by removing the harness of money completely will we ever be free.

Thread: Uruguay Takes On London Bankers, Marlboro Mad Men And TPP
[-] 2 points by flip (7101) 2 hours ago

thought this might interest you - "If anyone could claim to be leading by example in an age of austerity, it is José Mujica, Uruguay's president, who has forsworn a state palace in favour of a farmhouse, donates the vast bulk of his salary to social projects, flies economy class and drives an old Volkswagen Beetle. But the former guerrilla fighter is clearly disgruntled by those who tag him "the world's poorest president" and – much as he would like others to adopt a more sober lifestyle – the 78-year-old has been in politics long enough to recognise the folly of claiming to be a model for anyone.

But the man who is best known as Pepe says those who consider him poor fail to understand the meaning of wealth. "I'm not the poorest president. The poorest is the one who needs a lot to live," he said. "My lifestyle is a consequence of my wounds. I'm the son of my history. There have been years when I would have been happy just to have a mattress." Advertisement He shares the home with his wife,Lucía Topolansky, a leading member of Congress who has also served as acting president. As I near the home of Uruguay's first couple, the only security detail is two guards parked on the approach road, and Mujica's three-legged dog, Manuela. Mujica cuts an impressively unpolished figure. Wearing lived-in clothes and well-used footwear, the bushy-browed farmer who strolls out from the porch resembles an elderly Bilbo Baggins emerging from his Hobbit hole to scold an intrusive neighbour.

The president is a former member of the Tupamaros guerrilla group, which wasnotorious in the early 1970s for bank robberies, kidnappings and distributing stolen food and money among the poor. He was shot by police six times and spent 14 years in a military prison, much of it in dungeon-like conditions. Since becoming leader of Uruguay in 2010, however, he has won plaudits worldwide for living within his means, decrying excessive consumption and pushing ahead with policies on same-sex marriage, abortion and cannabis legalisation that have reaffirmed Uruguay as the most socially liberal country in Latin America.

But the man who is best known as Pepe says those who consider him poor fail to understand the meaning of wealth. "I'm not the poorest president. The poorest is the one who needs a lot to live," he said. "My lifestyle is a consequence of my wounds. I'm the son of my history. There have been years when I would have been happy just to have a mattress." Advertisement He shares the home with his wife,Lucía Topolansky, a leading member of Congress who has also served as acting president. As I near the home of Uruguay's first couple, the only security detail is two guards parked on the approach road, and Mujica's three-legged dog, Manuela. Mujica cuts an impressively unpolished figure. Wearing lived-in clothes and well-used footwear, the bushy-browed farmer who strolls out from the porch resembles an elderly Bilbo Baggins emerging from his Hobbit hole to scold an intrusive neighbour.

Uruguay's options to improve society are limited, he believes, by the power of global capital. "I'm just sick of the way things are. We're in an age in which we can't live without accepting the logic of the market," he said. "Contemporary politics is all about short-term pragmatism. We have abandoned religion and philosophy … What we have left is the automatisation of doing what the market tells us." The president lives within his means and promotes the use of renewable energy and recycling in his government's policies. At the United Nations' Rio+20 conference on sustainable development last year, he railed against the "blind obsession" to achieve growth through greater consumption. But, with Uruguay's economy ticking along at a growth rate of more than 3%, Mujica – somewhat grudgingly, it seems – accepts he must deliver material expansion. "I'm president. I'm fighting for more work and more investment because people ask for more and more," he said. "I am trying to expand consumption but to diminish unnecessary consumption … I'm opposed to waste – of energy, or resources, or time. We need to build things that last. That's an ideal, but it may not be realistic because we live in an age of accumulation." Asked for a solution to this contradiction, the president admits he doesn't have the answers, but the former Marxist said the search for a solution must be political. "We can almost recycle everything now. If we lived within our means – by being prudent – the 7 billion people in the world could have everything they needed. Global politics should be moving in that direction," he said. "But we think as people and countries, not as a species."

. "The world will always need revolution. That doesn't mean shooting and violence. A revolution is when you change your thinking. Confucianism and Christianity were both revolutionary," he said. But he is cynical about demonstrations organised by social networks that quickly dissolve before they have a capacity to build anything lasting. "The protesters will probably finish up working for multinationals and dying of modern diseases. I hope that I am wrong about that."

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 1 points by SerfingUSA (144) 2 hours ago

Ordo ab chao.

Chaos amongst the 99%, enables the 1% to have order over society.

You are starting to suffer from what I affectionately refer to as twinkle toes syndrome, wherein you assume that because people tend not to like the way you interact online with other people, it then means they don't support your causes or read your posts.

Come on peter pan, count chocula, lets get it together.

Thread: Uruguay Takes On London Bankers, Marlboro Mad Men And TPP
[-] 3 points by johannus (77) from Newburgh, NY 2 hours ago

Imagine that, Uruquay not wanting to get sucked into the New World Order.

I guess that we have bigger fish to fry before we send our special forces there.

Good link, Thanks.

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 1 points by turbocharger (1718) 2 hours ago

Perhaps that is an issue also?

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 0 points by turbocharger (1718) 2 hours ago

haha is there a small change that most all of us agree on teh basics and theres some sick entity- perhaps two companies- that seem to enjoy and profit off of creating two sides to every story?!! haha.

yes

people will work at weapons factories without accepting the consequences

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 2 points by flip (7101) 4 hours ago

now we agree- i like it when we do!

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 2 points by SerfingUSA (144) 4 hours ago

When a healthcare system is based on profits, greed and exploitation of the sick, of course there will be mismanagement. If a population of 330 million is too large to manage a healthcare system for, it's too large to manage an entire nation for.

Thread: Republican Party leaders celebrate wins, look ahead.
[-] -2 points by factsrfun (6464) from Phoenix, AZ 4 hours ago

Keep trying to absolve yourself of helping to elect the GOP, but there will be people here to remind you of all your favorite party does, those you work so hard to elect will be doing your bidding day by day, you have won now we will see how your guys do.

Says the guy who just voted for record wall st profits, bailouts, wars and pollution.

Talk about irresponsible!! Holy crap!! Another Republicrat Scoobie!!! Yoinks!!

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 2 points by turbocharger (1718) 4 hours ago

We certainly have an insane system as it stands now. Something as simple as going to the doctor has been turned into the most complicated transaction we have.

Thread: Two years in and more guns than ever, will the GOP fix this?
[-] 2 points by factsrfun (6464) from Phoenix, AZ 4 hours ago

the source of the problem is that people don't take voting seriously nor do they accept the consequences of their actions, whether those people are in congress or not it is the lack of responsibility in the voting process that leads to inhumanity

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 2 points by flip (7101) 4 hours ago

i disagree - while decentralization can be helpful it can also lead to people in alabama getting shitty health care. the government should run health insurance the way it runs va life insurance. cut out all the profit and admin overhead of our convoluted health care system. that would be real socialism. i have no argument that trying to make it work better may lead to something that is not monolithic but what we have now is insane!

Thread: Harkin speaking some truth...
[-] 1 points by turbocharger (1718) 5 hours ago

I think that the mismanagement that would result in a group trying to manage healthcare for 330 million people would be absolutely insane.

This is an area where I think massive decentralization needs to happen, if socialist policy were to be effective.

Thread: The Fear of Equality
[-] 2 points by turbocharger (1718) 6 hours ago

Ok, well driving a bus is a bit less skill than running a roofing crew efficiently.

Efficiency is key to most of this stuff. Anyone can do it, but who can do it best?

Generally it is the people who have integrity, morality and respect that move up in organizations. I'm not talking about the blood sucking hedge funds here, Im talking about your average everyday businesses.

How about the guys who were functioning drug addicts? They showed up and put in a decent day. Not a great work day, but another body that is moving. Should they make the same amount as someone like me that is dedicating my life to making to the company better? And if so, what do you think that would do to my personal motivation to be the best I can be?

When you break the marketplace down the furthest point, you end up at the individual. Humans tend to act in self interest, with outside interests usually only going out as far as constant communication permits (even the most peaceful societies has factions warring).

What motivates these people the best? Give them the best possibly opportunity to not only take care of their family (the minimum) but also to build something to be proud of (the upper levels of motivation)?

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