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Forum Post: [DELETED]

Posted 1 year ago on March 10, 2013, 10:08 p.m. EST by anonymous ()
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8 Comments

8 Comments


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[-] 2 points by Stormcrow1now (6) from Jersey City, NJ 1 year ago

Hate to say it but this type of "decomposition" has been used by gardeners for years -

In addition to that, you can compost all your waste and turn it in to rich nutrient soil for you garden.

If you look on the web or youtbe and do a search for "composting" you will see what I am talking about.

Been there done that.

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[-] 2 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

If you have limited space, you can do this cheap option, and get worm wee (fluid) from your kitchen scraps. No smell, and no mess. Just drain the liquid off, and water it down to feed your plants.

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[-] 2 points by analystwanabe99 (153) 1 year ago

Thanks Builder, there are lots of options on the net. One for everyone. The main thought here is with each little morsel the worms eat that is just that much less co2 and methane and that much more fertilizer for your plants. Out of 30 bags in 6 months I took 12 heaping wheelbarrows to the garden. If those leaves had gone to the landfill they would still be gassing co2 and methane.That was in 05 when I did all my testing.

[-] 2 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Yeah, I'm with you on methane.

Though I'm curious as to why it wasn't a problem when millions of buffalo, wildebeast, antelope, roamed the earth.

I like the worm castings for food production, because unlike fertilizers (even organic ones) trace elements in all their minute kinds are present. That is what is missing in a lot of our foods today.

Most fertilizers, as you know, rely on the three ingredients, with just enough of a few other things, to keep plants alive, rather than thriving, and when you see a well-managed permaculture garden, you can see what thriving really means.

[-] 1 points by quantumystic (1710) from Memphis, TN 1 year ago

Many homeowners associations prevent you from composting on your property.

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[-] 1 points by quantumystic (1710) from Memphis, TN 1 year ago

good idea

[-] 2 points by analystwanabe99 (153) 1 year ago

Rules like those are always meant to be broken. I understand the underlying fears by the folks in the area but if you use a little thought you can keep their fears soothed and get what you need done at the same time. If you line the inside of the box with 4 mil plastic it will last longer but dont forget to drill the drain holes around the bottom and make sure they penetrate the plastic also. I put a 1/4 inch hole every 2 feet. Also my box was off the ground on 4X4s.

[-] 2 points by Stormcrow1now (6) from Jersey City, NJ 1 year ago

If the compost pile is in your back yard they can't do a thing about it - now if you live on a "postage stamp" lot then I say "good luck".