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Forum Post: Private Prisons & Incarceration Insanity ~ The Class War on the Penal Front

Posted 1 year ago on Feb. 7, 2013, 3:01 a.m. EST by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR
This content is user submitted and not an official statement

Banking on Bondage: Private Prisons and Mass Incarceration

ACLU | November 2, 2011

Executive Summary

The imprisonment of human beings at record levels is both a moral failure and an economic one — especially at a time when more and more Americans are struggling to make ends meet and when state governments confront enormous fiscal crises. This report finds, however, that mass incarceration provides a gigantic windfall for one special interest group — the private prison industry — even as current incarceration levels harm the country as a whole. While the nation's unprecedented rate of imprisonment deprives individuals of freedom, wrests loved ones from their families, and drains the resources of governments, communities, and taxpayers, the private prison industry reaps lucrative rewards. As the public good suffers from mass incarceration, private prison companies obtain more and more government dollars, and private prison executives at the leading companies rake in enormous compensation packages, in some cases totaling millions of dollars.

The Spoils of Mass Incarceration

The United States imprisons more people — both per capita and in absolute terms — than any other nation in the world, including Russia, China, and Iran. Over the past four decades, imprisonment in the United States has increased explosively, spurred by criminal laws that impose steep sentences and curtail the opportunity to earn probation and parole. The current incarceration rate deprives record numbers of individuals of their liberty, disproportionately affects people of color, and has at best a minimal effect on public safety. Meanwhile, the crippling cost of imprisoning increasing numbers of Americans saddles government budgets with rising debt and exacerbates the current fiscal crises confronting states across the nation.

Leading private prison companies essentially admit that their business model depends on high rates of incarceration. For example, in a 2010 Annual Report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the largest private prison company, stated: "The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely affected by . . . leniency in conviction or parole standards and sentencing practices . . . ."

As incarceration rates skyrocket, the private prison industry expands at exponential rates, holding ever more people in its prisons and jails, and generating massive profits. Private prisons for adults were virtually non-existent until the early 1980s, but the number of prisoners in private prisons increased by approximately 1600% between 1990 and 2009. Today, for-profit companies are responsible for approximately 6% of state prisoners, 16% of federal prisoners, and, according to one report, nearly half of all immigrants detained by the federal government. In 2010, the two largest private prison companies alone received nearly $3 billion dollars in revenue, and their top executives, according to one source, each received annual compensation packages worth well over $3 million.

A Danger to State Finances

While supporters of privatization tout the idea that governments can save money through private facilities, the evidence for supposed cost savings is mixed at best. As state governments across the nation confront deep fiscal deficits, the assertion that private prisons demonstrably reduce the costs of incarceration can be dangerous and irresponsible. Such claims may lure states into building private prisons or privatizing existing ones rather than reducing incarceration rates and limiting corrections spending through serious criminal justice reform.

This year, advocates of for-profit prisons trotted out privatization schemes as a supposed answer to budgetary woes in numerous states:

Arizona has announced plans to award 5,000 additional prison beds to private contractors, despite a recent statement by the Arizona Auditor General that for-profit imprisonment in Arizona may cost more than incarceration in publicly-operated facilities. Arizona's Department of Corrections is the only large agency in that state not subject to a budget cut in fiscal year 2012 — in fact, the Department's budget increased by $10 million. According to a news report, private prison employees and corporate officers contributed money to Governor Jan Brewer's reelection campaign, and high ranking Brewer Administration officials previously worked as private prison lobbyists.

Florida has responded to exploding incarceration costs largely through increasing reliance on private prisons. Although the assertion that private prisons save taxpayer money is highly questionable, supporters of privatization, according to a recent news report, claim that privatization in Florida is necessary to rein in the prison system's budget, which stood at $2.3 billion in 2010. A recent editorial in the Orlando Sentinel expressed the view that privatization "has eclipsed and shelved potentially more fruitful, cost-effective changes. One of them is sentencing reform." On September 30, 2011, a Florida court enjoined the Department of Corrections from implementing the privatization of prisons in 18 counties, finding that the planned privatization failed to comply with procedures mandated by state law. The court stated, "[t]he decision to issue only one [request for proposal] and only one contract for all 29 prison facilities [subject to proposed privatization] was based on convenience and speed, … rather than on any demonstrated savings or benefit advantage."

Ohio recently announced that it will become, on December 31, 2011, the first state in the nation to sell a publicly operated prison, Lake Erie Correctional Facility, to a private company, CCA. Notably, the head of Ohio's corrections department had served as a managing director of CCA. The claim that prison privatization demonstrably reduces costs and trims government budgets may detract from the critical work of reducing the state's prison population.

Louisiana narrowly defeated a proposal, pushed by Governor Bobby Jindal in a desperate attempt to generate short-term revenue, to sell off three state prisons to private companies. The Louisiana House Appropriations Committee blocked the bill by a vote of 13-12, with legislators expressing deep concern about the wisdom of selling off the state's assets.

The federal government is in the midst of a private prison expansion spree, driven primarily by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), an agency that locks up roughly 400,000 immigrants each year and spends over $1.9 billion annually on custody operations. ICE now intends to create a new network of massive immigration detention centers, managed largely by private companies, in states including New Jersey, Texas, Florida, California and Illinois. According to a news report, in August 2011, ICE's plans to send 1,250 immigration detainees to Essex County, New Jersey threatened to unravel amid allegations that a private prison company seeking the contract, whose executives enjoyed close ties to Governor Chris Christie, received "special treatment" from the county. The fiscal crisis confronting the federal government, however, has done nothing to dampen Washington's spending binge on privatized immigration detention.

Atrocious Conditions

CONTINUED:


Part One of this Report traces the rise of the for-profit prison industry over the past 30 years, demonstrating that private prisons reaped lucrative spoils as incarceration rates reached historic levels. Part Two focuses on the supposed benefits associated with private prisons, showing that the view that private prison companies provide demonstrable economic benefits and humane facilities is debatable at best. Part Three discusses the tactics private prison companies have used to obtain control of more and more human beings and taxpayer dollars.

The time to halt the expansion of for-profit incarceration is now. The evidence that private prisons provide savings compared to publicly operated facilities is highly questionable, and certain studies point to worse conditions in for-profit facilities. The private prison industry helped to create the mass incarceration crisis and feeds off of this social ill. Private prisons cannot be part of the solution — economic or ethical — to the problem of mass incarceration.

http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/banking-bondage-private-prisons-and-mass-incarceration

The Caging of America

Why do we lock up so many people?

by Adam Gopnik January 30, 2012

Six million people are under correctional supervision in the U.S.

Six million people are under correctional supervision in the U.S.—more than were in Stalin’s gulags.

A prison is a trap for catching time. Good reporting appears often about the inner life of the American prison, but the catch is that American prison life is mostly undramatic—the reported stories fail to grab us, because, for the most part, nothing happens. One day in the life of Ivan Denisovich is all you need to know about Ivan Denisovich, because the idea that anyone could live for a minute in such circumstances seems impossible; one day in the life of an American prison means much less, because the force of it is that one day typically stretches out for decades. It isn’t the horror of the time at hand but the unimaginable sameness of the time ahead that makes prisons unendurable for their inmates. The inmates on death row in Texas are called men in “timeless time,” because they alone aren’t serving time: they aren’t waiting out five years or a decade or a lifetime. The basic reality of American prisons is not that of the lock and key but that of the lock and clock.

CONTINUED: http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2012/01/30/120130crat_atlarge_gopnik?currentPage=all

The Growth and Increasing Costs of the Federal Prison System: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412693-The-Growth-and-Increasing-Cost-of-the-Federal-Prison-System.pdf

http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/12/12/3139333/video-shows-15-year-old-girl-being.html

http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2012/11/27/1241471/private-prison-enlisted-in-public-schools-drug-raids/

142 Comments

142 Comments


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[-] 3 points by GirlFriday (17435) 1 year ago

About 6 months ago, a county near mine came out with the statement in the newspaper that they wanted to find out if it was more cost effective to privatize their jail. It is 2013. Same shit as they did in Florida.

"Well, gee, I dunno."

You have to be flat out stupid or benefit financially. Really.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Or waging war!

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 1 year ago

Faux privatization is theft.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Faux? Real Privatization, Real Crime!

if i missed your meaning, i'm up all night, west coast

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 1 year ago

Yes. Faux privatization. You are familiar with the term. Your tax dollars are still paying the cost, however, it sold to the public as privatized.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Oh, taxpayer paid "privatized prisons."

Like taxpayer subsidized privatized gas, oil and coal.

They love their dirty little socialist profits secret, don't they?

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 1 year ago

Like the faux privatization of schools.

This means that as a tax payer you pay for lawsuits as well.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Education should be my next front in the class war series.

Got any good recent stuff?

Please feel free to add to the fronts. Or come up with new ones.

I believe the deliberate dysfunction of various institutions and systems of our society go completely under the radar for most of our society. Out of sight, out of mind.

I'm nothing if not team and unity oriented.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 1 year ago

We've had prior postings on it, Thrass.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

As I said out of sight, out of mind.

"Thrass"?

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 1 year ago

You can find 'em. It's real easy. :D

Huh? What?

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

What's "Thrass" and "D"??

remember, up all night and chard...

[-] 3 points by GirlFriday (17435) 1 year ago

The state plans to outsource prison food to Aramark, a private vendor already under investigation in Kentucky for multiple contract violations, including serving old food that had not been stored properly and overbilling the state.


That's another area that needs to get verbally abused and private medical/mental health in prisons.

[-] 3 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Because they look at the inmates as less than human. And they assume people will disregard the condition of convicted criminals.

It's disgusting.

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

The way that the prison industrial complex is going about its business does far more harm than it does good

Good post Smith

~Odin~

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

And the yahoo on here wants to blame unions.

[-] 0 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

The money that prison unions pour into the coffers of political canidates is part of the problem, but it is far from being the main problem

~Odin~

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

drop in the bucket

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

US has more prisoners, prisons than any other country

America's incarceration rates are highest in the world

By Natasha Lennard | Monday, Oct 15, 2012 10:52 AM PDT

The U.S. imprisons around 730 in every 100,000 people — the highest incarcerated population in the world — Department of Justice data shows. Once again, the U.S. has beat any other nation in terms of its number of prisoners and prisons. There are currently around 2.2 million people behind bars, “equal to a city the size of Houston,” noted Bloomberg News. There are 4,575 prisons in operation in the U.S., more than four times the number of second-place Russia at 1,029.

According to California Prison Focus, “no other society in human history has imprisoned so many of its own citizens.” Ample studies in recent years have detailed the swift rise nationwide in the for-profit prison industry.

Bloomberg’s “chart of the day” Monday illustrates U.S. incarceration rates in comparison to other countries (via International Centre for Prison Studies):

[This is Class Warfare!]

http://www.salon.com/2012/10/15/us_has_more_prisoners_prisons_than_any_other_country/

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Court system clearly unfair to minorities and poor.

http://truth-out.org/news/item/15178-americas-three-tiered-justice-system

Upd in compliment to bump up this important post.

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Class War!!

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

We've been in class war for all history, and under withering attack for 3 decades.

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

'bout time we fought back, don't you think?

WE have to do some waking up first, cuz many of us think WE are the enemy, not the invisible 1%!!

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

We are fighting back. Our efforts have not gelled up to it's full potential but it will.

It will take years of hard sustained work in the streets & the voting booth.

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

How can we fight when the majority hasn't a clue.

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

The word is spreading though, as evidenced by this week's Beyond The Bars community collaborative at Columbia University

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Hope you're right. Meanwhile, the Class War that we are waiting for the word to "spread" about is being waged on multiple fronts.

http://occupywallst.org/forum/the-corporate-betrayal-of-america-class-war-on-the/

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

I hope I'm right too.

~Odin~

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

we finally agree

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

;-), but wait one more comment to answer from you.

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Our efforts are waking people up as you suggested earlier.

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Who? where?

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Well I don't have a list, but Occupy Sandy, Strikedebt, and other efforts are helping to wake people up.

It's hard to see but you must keep fighting. You must keep educating, marching, petitioning, writing letters, calling pols, voting.

Slow success, setbacks will be discouraging ut you must keep at it.

[-] 4 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

I will. Just thought you had some stats.

The thing we have on our side is: that the more people know about Cons, the more they reject them. And the more people know about Dems, the more they reject them

[-] 2 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

There is plenty to reject among all parties. I submit, of the 2 parties in power only the Dems offer any hope of implementing changes that benefit the 99%.

But Dems must be pressured to grow a bigger set and a stronger backbone.

In addition Dems must be denounced for any of their own corruption. They aren't immune.

Money out of politics, repeal cu. That is the 1st priority.

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

That will happen when the constituents of the DEMS actually show up to Vote. Not just a bare minimum. VOTER TURNOUT!! The key to democracy!!!

[-] 3 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Agreed! And we know it is true because we still see great efforts by republicans to suppress Dem voters with new unnecessary rules and gerrymandering, and electoral schemes.

Registration, & turnout is key to taking back our govt. Personally I want mandatory voting for all eligible citizens. THAT is what the 1% fear the most.

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

With you on that.

[-] 0 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

Actually getting people outside the D/R scam into Congress is the key, if reform is your cup of tea.

Forcing people to vote who dont want to would be a perfect solution for this fascist state.

Now switch over.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Getting everyone to vote will bring more support for 3rd parties. You want 3rd party success? Then push for election/campaign changes, and a larger turnout.

We force people to perform jury duty, and pay taxes. 1 hour every year to vote does not equate to fascism, that's you pathetically trying to suppress the vote in a desperate attempt to protect libertarian/conservative policy goals.

Mandatory voting, election/campaign reform.

[-] -1 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

Nice, now you are comparing this insane taxing to voting.

If people dont want to take an hour out of their day to vote, then quite frankly they are just going to go with the herd if forced to anyways.

Then instead of having criminals that 50% support, they can claim 100% back em. Just like Saddam.

[-] 0 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

Behaviors are controlled by the unconscious mind. Courts will not allow understanding or treatment of it. They all violate their oaths as tv trained consumers seek more gratification.

The facts of one Americans efforts to enable America to address more than 10% of its mind.

http://algoxy.com/law

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

It's Class War, we're losing. Wake Up!

[-] 0 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

Perhaps, it may also be such a class war as we,be never conceived of before.

The elite agree and collude unconsciously, we can't even agree consciously,

Wake up means you need to realize you are currently operating with 10% of your mental capacity and that the elite are winning because they use the unconscious mind.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Yes, their, the elite/1%, cause is greed, many unspoken allies in greed.

Wake up means we are engaged in war and have no idea who with. Look Up, not at each other!!!

Wake up, it's Class War, and we're losing.

[-] -1 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

Ok, class war, but WHAT really are the differences because you've inadvertantly stated that their greed is more powerful than our . . . whatever.

This reinforces the ART5 notion that IF we agree (their power) on what constitutional intent is, that is what it will be, because we are many, many more in agreement than their simple cabal of greed.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

What are you trying to say? Just come out and say it? 1% and 99% parity?

Not "more powerful," just easy, the alliance is tacit, like you said, subconscious.

Are you suggesting a two thirds overruling of the greedy 1%?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Five_of_the_United_States_Constitution

I'd go for a maximum wage. We don't need a few assholes hoarding million$ and billion$ when so many are destitute and homeless. Is justice an absurdity to you?

[-] 0 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

What's this Win/lose theme?

You make a choice to continue playing the consumer game.

You can always just walk away.

It's quite liberating, really. Try it sometime soon.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

NO!

We have no choice, there is no walk away! Once born, we pay to live in every imaginable way. The choice is to live or die, win or lose.

The 1% is winning and we in the 99% are losing.

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Bogus. You've been conned.

What have you got to lose in walking away?

Robosigning can take your house.

Banksters can take your savings.

Don't you get it? Only you can set you free.

[-] 1 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Only WE can reform/defeat this aberrant system.

Why do you strive to individualize it?

That's a loser?

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Only YOU can make a choice, my friend.

Only YOU can strive to individualize.

Only YOU can get with the programme.

You're not a loser, unless you've lost hope.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

So they do have Tea Baggers in Australia.

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

I doubt it.

But thanks for the giggles.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

When WE Unite, WE Win!!

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Yay team.

Are we red or blue this week?

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Let's go with Blue. We've had enough Red Regression.

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Sweet. I love the colour Blue.

Thankyou. I sure hope the Red guys don't get too jealous again.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

They exist in a constant state of jealousy... fear and hate.

Who wants that?

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Poor fellas.

Should we send them some cake?

[-] 0 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

I like your notion of leaving the "consumer game", do you stop consuming or justifiably consume elsewhere? Might I ask where:-)?

[-] -1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Food shop at the local grower's markets. Clothes shop from charities. I just got my "new" hiking boots from Save the Children fund's shop for five dollars. I did buy a new backpack, and did the research on where it is made, to avoid the possibility of child labour being involved. Socks and jocks are new, of course, and it's difficult to find them locally made, but not impossible. My new longjohns came from Hungary, of all places.

But, I do use a vehicle and tools for work, and I do fly when I have to. And I pay for internet use, which is for convenience, but not unavoidable.

[-] 0 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

Okay, live the ALT consumer game instead of the national corporate consumer game whenever possible.

Could I suggest a term? "Selective corporate consumption". Certainly something which will be a consumer talent IF we are to prevail over blind, capitalistic consumerism created by media manipulation.

Doing this really well, quickly, requires really developed communications that are centralized having absolute integrity. Or, doing at all is a hit or miss (as we are), BUT, locally communicated and demonstrated.

I do it like you do it but would very much like to see a really developed consumer advocacy site that consolidated info about products, corporations, etc.

[-] -1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

You know, that is a brilliant concept.

There would be a need for localised content, so many heads would need to be involved. Like an international group of concerned consumers.

Just finding out what products contain palm oil is a shopper's nightmare.

[-] 0 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

I think we need the usenet back. This piece of crap .com is aiding and abetting our rape.

Just that in 15 year no one has made a site that uses our opinion of our discussion relating to our productive agreement, to order the information making the best visible immediately, is kind of mind boggling.

What, we can invent the wheel but not figure out how to roll it?

[-] -1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

I remember usenet. It was part of a site I used to help moderate.

What happened there?

Happy to see this new international journalist org popping up.

[-] 1 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

Prior to 1995, the only internet in existence for Americans and others in the world was the usenet. In 1995 .com was created pushing the usenet into obscurity.

For me it disappeared, I use Mac's. Mac's did not interface with the usenet without certain data entered into special software which was only available from the IP. PC's apparently could simply login(?) Recently, I heard, all of it disappeared with millions of gigs of data of all types accumulated for 15+ years.

What? "new international journalist org"

[-] -1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

I haven't had time to do all the background checks, but the UK Guardian is backing it, so that's half the battle won, for mine. It's the ICIJ, or International Consortium of International Journalists.

http://www.icij.org/blog/2013/04/likely-largest-journalism-collaboration-history

GypsyKing shared a link about the 32 trillion (found) in offshore bank accounts, and this ICIJ is investigating the list of those involved.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (28457) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Would really love to see the surviving real/honest journalists network with all of the People's movements.


[-] 2 points by Builder (3955) 0 minutes ago

When I get a chance, I'll be looking into this a bit deeper.

It all takes time. The Guardian has been a shining light in journalistic integrity during this very murky propaganda-riddled time, and they are backing this new org, so that's a great start, for mine.

Peter Harvey, one of our true Australian legend journalists just succumbed to cancer, which was a shame, because he always gave the facts, without the hype. ↥twinkle ↧stinkle permalink

[-] -2 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Yes, as much as I respect RT news, they seem to have followed more of the infotainment style that is a distraction, generally, to the content. At the other end of the scale, is SBS World news, which is so dry it puts me to sleep.

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (28457) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Likely Largest Journalism Collaboration In History

How the HELL did that happen? In this day and age of the corpoRAT owned Media.

BTW - there was a story on that on the PBS News Hour Tonight.

[-] 0 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

When I get a chance, I'll be looking into this a bit deeper.

It all takes time. The Guardian has been a shining light in journalistic integrity during this very murky propaganda-riddled time, and they are backing this new org, so that's a great start, for mine.

Peter Harvey, one of our true Australian legend journalists just succumbed to cancer, which was a shame, because he always gave the facts, without the hype.

[-] 1 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

ICIJ, or International Consortium of International Journalists-thx for the clarification.

[-] -1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

D'oh! Investigative journalism.

Touch-typing doesn't always pick up on typos.

[-] -1 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

Only because we can't agree on constitutional intent or that doing so makes us "the rightful masters of the congress and the courts".

Only because a hidden elite financed American education to teach socialism instead of the constitution.

Only because a hidden elite financed a selected group of socialist trained quasi leaders to run ows.

Hmm, I guess to make only the right word, I'd have to take off the last 2 causes and leave the first.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

To ensure a free press for an informed people, the welfare and happiness of the people and promote an ever more perfect (progressive) union. We've neglected quite a bit.

[-] 1 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

When we involve with corporatism year after year without looking at what life can be without it while also not socially examining the powerful social structures that have historically sought to control populations by selecting knowledge for them, or forbidding certain knowledge to them, it turns out it could be things that really matters.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Oh, and the strict regulation of emerging (kingly) tyrants, like today's 1% and corporations. Too bad we are so easily distracted, deceived and discouraged.

Wake Up, America! It's Class War, and we are losing!

[-] 1 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

Yes, but have you thought about the totality of classes involved and exactly what they do, what their differences are? Why they can so easily control material power?

[-] 1 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Do tell.

[-] 0 points by redandbluestripedpill (333) 1 year ago

The class that is winning is using the unconscious mind for cooperation and unity. Unfortunately, in the compulsive secrecy natural to unconscious group operations, many have been heavily infiltrated by very dark and de-evolutionary forces over a few centuries.

Are you aware of how global societies of the past used the unconscious? What they used it for? Unlikely.

We, the melting pot of America relinquished even recognition of what existed before the written word and now have a hard time believing anything that is not written.

[-] 1 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

I see.

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

In upstate NY where I am from you either move, work for the county/state govt in some capacity this means as a prison guard if you don't have a degree or a highway/village worker, or you work at the raceway casino, or you are a drug dealer/hustler. That is it. Oh you can work for walmart or home depot.

[-] 2 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

No!, You do not know me,

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

that is just sickening.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

And it only creates hardened criminals.

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

it may create a monster capable of destroying the system.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Not likely. except in the movies.

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

it can make a man driven and hardened.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

No doubt, but not enough to destroy the system. That will take a great many more of us.

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

Desperate courage makes One a majority.----andrew jackson

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

you are ignoring the complex relationship between us presidents and native american nations by the way. there is a reason the president is referred to as the great white father.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Why?

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

complicated

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

You are mistaken. but THAT is ok as well.!

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Maybe for the ignorant. Most people understand the reality of the genocidal relationship between the European and native peoples of America.

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

no i don't think you do. but thats okay.

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

surely you didn't post that thinking you were teaching me anything. i have forgotten far more about history than you will ever know.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

How do you know that?

[-] -1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

because i know a fuck ton.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Do you know that saying you "know more" than someone you don't know is is moronic right?

Cause I know that which kinda proves you know less.

Y'know?

[-] -2 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

but i do know you.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

But you don't know how much I know. So your statement is just meaningless bluster. Ego boosting, unprovable, & irrelevant.

But I guess you know that. LOL

[-] -2 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

i know you don't know more than i know. cheers.

[-] 0 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

And I didn't post it to teach you anything. Only to make sure that your lionizing ofthat piece of shit President be balanced with some truths that weigh heavier than some profound quotes.

LMFAO!

"they made their decision, now let them enforce it". That is a more important Jackson quote, because it led to the deaths of thousands and the dislocation of a native people!

[-] -1 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

He'd fit right in with the leaders of the last 15 years.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Seems to me the scotus has gone right along no? i don't think there has been defiance of any scotus decisions.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Scream it from the rooftops, This is fucked up! This is Class Warfare! Wake UP! Fight Back! ORGANIZE!!!

[-] 0 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

"ORGANIZE!!!"... I would love to see this forum turn towards that.

Theres a little bit on the site in regards to organizing, but it could be elaborated on greatly.

[-] 1 points by inclusionman (7064) 1 year ago

Activism against prison injustice!!

It's happening. Get involved, instead of criticizing people actively spreading the word.

http://october2011.org/blogs/kevin-zeese/dc-activist-group-fights-rights-incarcerated

[-] 0 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

What do you think Unite and Win means? Fuck you HC!

[-] 0 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

Unite and Win is a slogan. Important in organizing (99% was an alltime great)...but just a slogan in the end.

Judging from your reaction, Im assumig you arent interested? haha.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Slogan (from you it sounds so dirty) as if you RepubliCons did anything for the 99% beyond slogans/BS ever. I think rallying call or cry might be better. You only care about the failure of democracy. And attempting to drag or smear anything good and progressive down to Con false equivalency. Only a fool/Con would do that!

[-] -2 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

That, sir, is one of the dumbest replies I have seen in a while.

Have you ever even been to an oraganizing meeting for a candidate/party/action/cause? l would love to see you stop the meeting to state it shouldnt be called slogan during the meeting...it should be a rallying call.

Thanks junior. Can we continue now?

[-] 1 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Con-lemming-fraud!

[-] -1 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

That seems about the reply we would be expecting as well. Then we would change your diaper.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Hungry or Horney Con-lemming-fraud!

[-] -1 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

You really think the statement "unite and win" is an example of political organizing?

I think your Vkag is showing, better tuck it back in.

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Don't you??

[+] -4 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

This is DM's new socks.

Say hi.

[-] -1 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

Im from Rochester (Brockport), where are you from?

The economy is depressed, but its not quite that bad.

If the weather was nicer, I would have stayed.

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Brockport, Erie Canal, i vaguely remembet that

Rochester, let's see....home of Eastman Kodak, Genessee beer & Paychex, right?

Most of northern and western NY was depressed as I remember because many of the jobs moved south or right out of the country

~Odin~

[-] 0 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

Ah yes, bridge jumping into the canal. Glad I didnt come out of the water with three eyes!! haha.

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Yes you're lucky with only having two eyes. That really is pretty country out there

Do you know how things are in Rochester?

I would imagine that Kodak is hurting with the rise of digital cameras

I always remember the commercials for Genessee beer. A guy would be over in Germany wishing he had a Genessee

That made me laugh, no offense

~Odin~

[-] 2 points by gnomunny (6587) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Kodak filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last year.

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Thanks for that.

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (6587) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

How was the day, Odin? Good and productive, I hope.

[-] 2 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

Ya, Genny Cream Ale is still around. I still like it, cant find it in Tampa. Or Labatts either.

Kodak has pretty much dumped on the whole city. Everyone assumes they were late to the digital game, but they werent, it was just bad management.

That being said, we are the world leader in fuel cell tech, which is awesome. And theres a ton of schools, so the population is pretty smart, compared to other areas. And pretty liberal as well, I had an apartment right off Park Ave for a while, great place to live.

All in all, the ROC was sheltered from the housing bubble so that avoided the crash, which means the UE rate was a bit lower for a bit (no one wants to invest in ROC) . But Im sure its leveled out by now.

Most of my group still lives there. Life goes on. Garbage plates, buffaloe wings, and late nights on Alexander street.

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

I used to get La Batts in returnable bottles in Glenns Falls, NY for like $5 a case I think

Genessee started to become a bigger regional beer, and you could find it here easily, but not anymore

Sounds like you are a little home-sick OTP

You just wanted to get in better weather?

Good Night ~Odin~

[-] 1 points by itsmyblood (10) 1 year ago

The only place worth living in ny is nyc and that is a fucked situation now the rest is a big bowl of shit, someone needs to flush.

[-] -2 points by Perfectcast (-168) 1 year ago

The prison unions are the issue. Prison unions want higher incarceration rates whcich leads to higher prisoner numbers, which increases prison employment, which increases prison union power. This is a union issue.

[-] 3 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Self centered people exist everywhere. But unions do not control policy. The greed-addled and entitled 1% who make profits from private prisons do. Nice try.

[-] 0 points by Nader (74) 1 year ago

You are both correct. If the unions and the corporations both stand to gain power, influence, and wealth by having higher incarceration rates (which they do), they will both stand together for higher incarceration rates. This is just common sense.

[-] 1 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

Enough with the False Equivalency flimflam! It's so 2010!

There is no, ZERO, parity with Multinational Corporations and anemic and persecuted US trade Unions. That is Malarkey (utter bull shit) the likes of "The Liberal Media," Fox "News," "patriotic" RepubliCons and "humanitarian" Private Prisons.

Unions want jobs, we all do in this 1%-RepubliCon contrived Unemployment tsunami, but not at the cost of falsely imprisoning fellow Americans. Profits at any cost are strictly a "Free Market" interpretation of "common sense."

[-] -1 points by Nader (74) 1 year ago

"Unions want jobs" - I agree 100%.

So if you are the leadership of the NCEU, you want jobs for your members. How do those jobs get created?

You honestly can't see how a lot of goals of the NCEU and the prison industrial complex are aligned? The only thing they have disagreement on is how to divvy up all the profits made by imprisoning people.

[-] 0 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 1 year ago

RepubliCons and the greed-addled 1% they worship and serve cannot conceive of a means too immoral to justify in achieving an end. But workers do every single day. That's why they go to work instead of cheat, rob, steal, defraud or harm other people. Cons just can't understand this, is this your problem?

[-] 0 points by Nader (74) 1 year ago

Again, I agree with a lot of what you say. The workers really don't have any control in it. They take the jobs available to them. They likely would like to hold on to those jobs as long as they can but that is besides the point.

The leadership of the NCEU, however, is an integral and important part of the prison industrial complex. You change the subject and, typical of most Americans, try to turn in this into a two-party argument. What I would rather hear, however, is how you think that the interests of the NCEU and the prison industrial complex are not both advanced when more people are imprisoned?

The corporations, unions, and ultimately the workers, all benefit when more people are imprisoned. Hence the term 'complex' in prison industrial complex. Why would any of those players want to see less people imprisoned?

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

It's far more than "prison unions" that are the problem

~Odin~