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Forum Post: I would NEVER buy a papa johns pizza

Posted 1 year ago on Nov. 21, 2012, 8:14 p.m. EST by bensdad (8977)
This content is user submitted and not an official statement

but it is good to know that the backlash against his anti-Obamacare BS worked!

28 Comments

28 Comments


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[-] 2 points by bensdad (8977) 1 year ago

denny's backed out of fining customers 5% for providing healthcare to employees

[-] 3 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

Let's boycott them anywhere. They've had a few racist lawsuits as I remember anyway.

[-] 2 points by bensdad (8977) 1 year ago

I would not buy denny's either

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

Do we have Dennys in NYC?

[-] 0 points by Coyote88 (-24) 1 year ago

What was the outcome of those "racist lawsuits)?

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

Why? Do you care? Ain't you heard about them?

Read a little!

http://www.complaints.com/2009/june/20/Racism_still_strong_at_Denny_s_207318.htm

[-] 0 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 1 year ago

isn't Palestine on the menu these days ?

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

I don't think Dennys would serve a Palestinian.

Are you pleased with the ceasefire.?

[-] 0 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 1 year ago

yes,

and this is this first I heard

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

Today they have begun the negotiations open the Gaza border.

(finally! "largest open air prison on earth" Chomsky on Gaza)

[-] 1 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 1 year ago

good

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

Palestinian claims IDF shot someone, otherwise ceasefire holding.

[+] -5 points by mapleLaneser (-120) 1 year ago

Please support anyone that is "against" obummerCare

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

NO! Boycott Anti worker PapaJohns, Walmarts & racist Dennys,

[-] 1 points by bensdad (8977) 1 year ago

SPECIFICALLY what is it that you do not like about the ACA?

[-] -2 points by Coyote88 (-24) 1 year ago

The cost.

[-] 1 points by bensdad (8977) 1 year ago

What will it cost YOU or anyone that you know - specifically please also let me read your source of this info
p I hope it's not papa john ]

[-] -2 points by ronniepaul2012 (214) 1 year ago

Indeed!! And who knows what else. Has Pelosi even read it yet?

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

Olive garbage caves to the power of the people.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/olive-garden-owner-hold-off-200230971.html

That's a success we chalk up for the Occupy movement.

[+] -5 points by mapleLaneser (-120) 1 year ago

What ACA are you referring to?

[-] 2 points by bensdad (8977) 1 year ago

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

[-] -2 points by mapleLaneser (-120) 1 year ago

Looks to me that the cons really outweigh the pros on it

[-] 1 points by bensdad (8977) 1 year ago

I'm impressed that it LOOKS like that to you
There are millions of idiots who think the Earth LOOKS less than 10,000 year old
Where is your math !!!!!!!!!!!!

[-] 1 points by VQkag2 (16478) 1 year ago

Well if its on the interwebs it must be true. LOL.

The one thing not listed is that the ACA establishes healthcare as a Fed right for the 1st time in US history.

In addition it has flexibility built in to allow states to create the public option we need to put the criminal private health insurance corps out of business.

[-] 1 points by LeoYo (5843) 1 year ago

Olive Garden Owner to Hold Off on Worker Changes

Olive Garden owner Darden Restaurants to hold off on worker changes tied to health care reform

By Candice Choi, AP Food Industry Writer | Associated Press – 20 hours ago

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/olive-garden-owner-hold-off-200230971.html

NEW YORK (AP) -- The owner of Olive Garden and Red Lobster says it won't bump any full-time workers down to part-time status, after its tests aimed at limiting health care costs resulted in a publicity backlash that took a bite out of sales.

At the same time, Darden Restaurants Inc. isn't ruling out relying more heavily on part-timers over the long haul.

The company, based in Orlando, Fla., is set to announce Thursday that none of its current full-time employees will have their status changed as a result of the new regulations. The move will come just two days after the company lowered its profit outlook for the year, citing failed promotions and negative publicity from its tests that used more part-time employees. The tests were aimed at keeping down costs tied to new health care regulations, which will require large companies to provide insurance to full-time workers starting in 2014. After Darden's tests were reported in October, the company received a flood of feedback from customers through its website, on Facebook and in restaurants, said Bob McAdam, who heads government affairs and community relations for Darden. Additionally, he said that internal surveys showed both employee and customer satisfaction declined at restaurants where the tests were in place.

"What that taught us is that our restaurants perform better when we have full-time hourly employees involved," he said.

McAdam declined to give specifics on the internal surveys but said the decline was "enough to make a decision." Beyond the first year of the regulation, however, the company said it still needs to see how costs and other factors play out to determine what its workforce will look like in following years.

For now, about 75 percent of the company's 185,000 employees are part-timers. Although that mix should hold for the time being, whether it changes in the future "will depend on how the business goes," McAdam said.

The company says its turnover rate is about 50 percent of employees a year, meaning it has significant flexibility to increase its use of part-time workers without changing the status of its current full-time workers.

Under the new health care law, companies with 50 or more workers could be hit with fines if they do not provide basic coverage for full-time workers and their dependents. Starting Jan. 1, those penalties and requirements could significantly boost labor costs for some companies, particularly in low-wage industries such as retail and hospitality where most jobs don't come with health benefits. Darden isn't alone in considering changes to its workforce as a result. CKE Restaurants, which owns Carl's Jr. and Hardee's fast-food chains, has said it plans to employ more part-time workers. McDonald's Corp., the world's biggest hamburger chain, has also noted that it was reviewing factors that impact its health care costs, including its number of full-time employees.

And earlier this month, Papa John's CEO John Schnatter wrote a column in the Louisville Courier-Journal after making comments that suggested business owners could find "loopholes" to get around the requirements, such as cutting hours. Following negative feedback, Schnatter's column clarified that it was a move he believed franchise owners and other small businesses would make, rather than the Papa John's as a company.

Darden's test began in February in four markets, although the company declined to say how many restaurants were involved. It included hiring more part-time workers and replacing full-time workers who left with part-time workers. In other cases, managers were told to ensure part-timers were given no more than 30 hours of work a week.

Darden's problems run deeper than the bad publicity related to the test, however. The company has been working to boost sales and attract customers at its flagship Olive Garden and Red Lobster restaurants, in part by putting a greater emphasis on value and updating menus. But on Tuesday, it noted that its recent promotions again failed to resonate with customers, and warned that it expected revenue at restaurants open at least a year to fall by 2.7 percent in its fiscal second quarter. The metric is a key gauge of health because it strips out the impact of newly opened and closed locations.

Beyond health care costs, Darden has made cutting labor costs a priority in recent years. In the most recent fiscal quarter, the company's restaurant labor costs were 31 percent of sales. That's down from 33 percent three years ago. The reduction has been driven by several measures.

Last year, for example, the company put workers on a "tip sharing" program, meaning waiters and waitresses share their tips with busboys, bartenders and other employees. This allows Darden to pay more workers a far lower "tip credit wage," rather than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Servers at Red Lobster also now handle four tables at a time, instead of three.

Andy Barish, a Jefferies analyst, on Wednesday cut his rating on Darden to "Hold" from "Buy," noting that the company's efforts to boost traffic have fallen flat. Sterne Agee analyst Lynne Collier backed her "Buy" rating but cut her price target by $8 to $55, attributing the company's weak second-quarter guidance to tough economic conditions and promotion-related mistakes. But at this point, she said the bad news is already reflected in the company's stock price.

Although Darden in part blamed negative publicity for the lower outlook for the year, it noted that the impact was hard to quantify. In the meantime, the company is hoping its assurances that its current full-time employees won't have their status changed in 2014 will allay customers' concerns and anger.

"In the midst of all the uncertainty, we thought it was important to say something declarative," McAdam said.

[-] 1 points by bensdad (8977) 1 year ago

very glad to see worker backlash against capitalist greed
GO UNION!