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Forum Post: How Americans can save 284.5 million gallons of oil a year, plus $4.6 billion, . . . without doing a damn thing.

Posted 1 year ago on Jan. 27, 2013, 7:47 p.m. EST by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO
This content is user submitted and not an official statement

It's a ball park estimate, of course, since there are a number of variables. The numbers may be lower. But they could be a hell of a lot higher. And I'm talking about refined oil, not crude. Here's the deal: Stop changing your oil so damn much! It's becoming fairly well-known that the 3000 mile oil change myth isn't valid. In fact, I'm being kind by referring to it as a myth. In my opinion it's a scam. You could Google something like “How often should I change my oil” or something similar but this article is what got me thinking about it:

http://www.edmunds.com/car-care/stop-changing-your-oil.html

Here's a fun fact: The United States spent about $330 billion on imported oil last year.

First off, I found it very interesting that Jiffy Lube is owned by Shell Oil Corporation and that in itself is very telling. As a professional delivery driver (ex-driver actually) we were, as 'independent contractors,' required to use our own vehicles and during a typical five day week 800 to 1000 miles were the norm. It was also not uncommon to haul 1000 pounds or more during a delivery. A few times I delivered a ton (40 boxes of letterhead at 50 pounds a box, for example, or a bed full of steel re-bar) which far exceeds the load capacity of your typical Ford Ranger or Mazda B series, and absolutely fits the owner's manual definition of “severe duty.” In 1994 I bought a brand new Mazda B2300 with a whopping 24 miles on the odometer and, at first, followed the 3000 mile oil change mantra but being an abashed procrastinator, it wasn't too long before my 3000 mile oil changes (that would be every three to four weeks) often stretched into 6000 or 7000 miles, occasionally 8500 or so. For the record, I do my own changes, I don't take it to the shops (I've known a few people whose engines were ruined by places like Jiffy Lube for such idiocy as forgetting to tighten the oil pan drain plug, and in one case the rookie forgot to even put the fresh oil in!). Also for the record I use products like Slick50 and am convinced these products do exactly as they claim. When I finally traded in my Mazda (for suspension and electrical issues, NOT mechanical), it had a little over 320,000 miles on the odometer and the engine still “purred like a kitten;” not a tap, knock or rough idle of any kind. So I can attest from hard-core experience that the 3000 mile oil change story is complete bullshit, perpetrated, obviously, by Big Oil for the express purpose of selling more oil and increasing their already obscene profits. I would absolutely follow Edmunds advice and use your owner's manual recommendations for scheduled oil changes and ignore that sticker Jiffy Lube (I mean Shell Oil Corp.) puts on your windshield as a 'courtesy reminder.' In fact, considering the auto makers are essentially members of the same club as Shell Oil/Jiffy Lube, in most cases you could probably stretch it out a bit further, although I wouldn't overdo it very much. Now the math, again just ballpark estimates (especially since it's almost impossible to know how many vehicle owners follow the 3000 mile limit. I've also known people who've NEVER changed their oil the entire time they've owned their ride. These people, friends or not, are morons.):

The average person drives approximately 15,000 miles a year which translates to five oil changes a year and at five quarts per change, 25 quarts a year. When I checked earlier today on line Jiffy Lube charges $25 per change, but some shops charge a little less and you may have a coupon for JL so let's say $20 per change. If you do it yourself it's almost double that. It's also higher if you use synthetic, but supposedly you get more miles between changes with synthetic. But for the sake of averages, let's call it 20 bucks a change, five times a year. Half as many oil changes a year translates to a savings of 3.1 gallons of oil and $50 cash savings PER VEHICLE.

According to the US Bureau of Transportation statistics for 2009, vehicle registration in the US was broken down thus: 193,979,654 classified as “light-duty vehicle, short wheel base.” 40,488,025 classified as “light-duty vehicle, long wheel base.” 8,356,097 classified as “two-axle, six tire.” 2,617,118 classified as “truck, combination” 7,929,725 classified as “motorcycles”

For this post I've only counted the 234,467,679 vehicles classified as “light-duty short and long wheelbase.” I've excluded motorcycles. I've excluded “truck, combination” because I'm assuming those are commercial vehicles. I've also excluded “two-axle, six tire” for the same reason, although a good portion of these are, in fact, what would be considered passenger vehicles (trucks with dual wheels on the rear) used as 'daily drivers.' So, excluding those three categories equates to about 234.5 million 'daily drivers' registered as of 2009.

Also according to the Bureau there are approximately 3.69 million new vehicle registrations a year, but assuming they mean vehicles fitting all five categories above, only 92% could be classified as “light-duty long and short wheelbase” which means there were somewhere around 244.7 million registered “daily drivers” in the US by 2012. If only three-quarters of these vehicles were running at any given time (we have four vehicles in our household but only two are being driven) that's 183.5 million passenger vehicles on the road regularly. If only half these vehicles (91.75 million) changed their oil half as much that equates to 284,425,000 gallons of engine oil (91.75 million vehicles x 3.1 gallons of oil per year) and, at a $50 per year savings per vehicle, $4,587,000,000. And, by the way, that nearly $4.6 billion goes straight into the pockets of the consumers, tax-free of course. I know 50 bucks a year doesn't sound like much on an individual basis, but cumulatively that's $4.6 billion a year spent in other areas of the US economy, but equally as important, NOT into the pockets of Big Oil!

And all without changing our habits or lifestyles one iota. Easy as pie. Spread the word.

P.S. My calculator broke and I was too lazy to dig another one out of storage so I did the math 'old school,' with paper and pen so if I misplaced a decimal point somewhere or, in the immortal words of Jethro Bodine, forgot to “carry the naught,” please let me know so I can edit the post. I'm sure the numbers are significant either way.

60 Comments

60 Comments


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[-] 2 points by jrhirsch (4714) from Sun City, CA 1 year ago

I changed my oil on my Ford Fairmont every 10 to 15 thousand miles. Usually just before the biannual smog check. It was still running strong after 250 thousand miles. But if you really want to save oil, get an economical car. My Ford Escort literally gets double the fuel economy that the old Fairmont got. 35 mpg vs.17 mpg. Driving just 5,000 miles a year I save 72 gallons of oil. A much greater savings compared to less frequent oil changes.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

A savings of oil and gas. A double-dip. And driving less miles, when possible, is definitely on the list of viable ideas that has a benefit of its own. Less miles = less wear and tear on the vehicle = less often you need to replace it.

[-] 2 points by Middleaged (5140) 1 year ago

I wanted to look at this from the Financial Scheme point of view, many of our government agencies, municipalities (probably), and big companies ... Lease vehicles with service contracts.

Service contracts for lease vehicles probably reinforce and strengthen the changing of oil at 3000 miles. Leased fleet vehicles therefore could be targeted in many governments or businesses ... and numbers can be come up with to show how your idea would save money & save petroleum products.

I like this idea. I know there is a lot of oil recyling programs, but you idea still works with those programs to lower overal usage and overall demand.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

If you were to factor in commercial vehicles, fleets, etc. the numbers would be staggering. I deliberately low-balled it for various reasons, one of which was to make it sound more doable. Also consider the massive numbers of small engines; lawn mowers, leaf blowers, and such, although I haven't a clue as to their oil usage or maintenance schedules, but it's entirely possible there could be savings there as well. It's probably safe to assume their schedules have been a bit manipulated for the same reason.

[-] 2 points by Middleaged (5140) 1 year ago

Well, lets hope someone in this forum takes this to some municipals, state governments, and to federal unions (workers) to get the idea filled out, planned out, and implemented with proper monitoring by the appropriate government officials ... to make the savings real.

[-] 2 points by Shule (1696) 1 year ago

Super post! Your proposal here to not change your car's oil so much falls in line with this "Life Style Adjustment Program" which I've been promoting. Enjoy life more by doing less. Save the planet by not working so much. Help Stop Global Warming by not breathing so much air. Yes, it is possible, . Do the world a favor by laying around and relaxing. The Budda got it right. Sit still and hummmm.

Of course that all flies in the face of big business, capitalism, and the corporate agenda. Imagine, doing nothing is actually revolutionary!

[-] 2 points by Middleaged (5140) 1 year ago

You both have good points that we have to stimulate debate about living the American Culture of the "Fast Life", fast service, immediate satisfaction, high trash living, throw away living, having all the latest gadgets, high usage of tree products for paper, card board, packaging, high usage of plastic products that are thrown away.

What is American Culture? Having all new stuff, obsessed with youth & beauty, consumerism, trashism.... Never having enough stuff or enough money.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Thanks, Shule. Yes, it does seem counter-intuitive to many people that we can do more by actually doing less. If you get the chance, give me more info on your "Lifestyle Adjustment Program." I'm compiling a new list of the numerous ways we as individuals can make a difference, in the hopes of making it into a post. I'm logging off pretty soon, but if you post it here or in a PM I'll definitely check it out tomorrow. And definitely add this proposal to yours and spread the word.

[-] 2 points by Shule (1696) 1 year ago

Actually, I pretty much said it already. There is not much to it (goes with the program), other than the mascot for the program is the Three toed Tree Sloth. He sleeps eighteen hours a day, and always has a smile on his face.

[-] -1 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Ah, I thought you might have had a list of ideas. No need, though, there's plenty of them floating around on the forum, it's just a matter of gathering them together (again). Although I do like the idea of the three-toed sloth as a mascot. I'm envisioning an OWS t-shirt with the sloth and some sort of clever, concise saying.

[-] 2 points by Shule (1696) 1 year ago

Cool.

I read somewhere up on a prior post, the average person drives 15,000miles a year. That is a lot. I drive less than 5000/yr, and most of that is on a small motorbike that gets 75mpg. The trick is to live close to work and the other things you need to get to. Like draw a five mile circle around yourself and see to it 99% is in there. I know that is hard for folks who are already situated in a place, but if one's new to a town and figuring out how set up, that is something to keep in mind.

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

City planning? No one should be 2.5 miles away from anything needed for the day to day life - like work or grocery store or gas station ( soon to be some other sort of station? or some other sort of gas ) ?

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

That's a damn good idea about the five mile circle prior to moving into a new place. I'm going to write that one down on my revised 'ideas' list. It's those kind of "out of the box" ideas that are worth considering.

[-] 2 points by fairforall (279) 1 year ago

Hardly any car's manufacturer's recommendation is 3k miles. My Lexus is 7500.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Exactly. That's why I concur with the Edmunds article (and others) that you should follow the owner's manual and ignore the 3000 mile myth, perpetuated by Big Oil, of course. In fact I can remember when they used to say 10,000 or 12,000 miles (if I remember correctly). Then it was 6,000, and it wasn't too long after that it was down to 3000. I was suspicious back then for that very reason.

[-] 2 points by Shule (1696) 1 year ago

Hmmm, sort of like cholesterol.

[-] 2 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

That's the problem with forum conversations, it's hard to tell when someone is being sarcastic. I'm going to assume you're not. But, for the sake of the forum at large (with the exception of Renneye, who has undoubtedly already read this):

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/10/22/debunking-the-science-behind-lowering-cholesterol-levels.aspx

[-] 2 points by Shule (1696) 1 year ago

"Acceptable" cholesterol levels were constantly being lowered by the pharmacy industry (much against the recommendations of many MDs) for the purposes of increasing statin sales. Same as with oil changes...

Older Americans can save many $$$$ simply by stop taking statins (and eating right instead.)

[-] 2 points by Renneye (3343) 1 year ago

Lol!!! Bingo!! Its not too often that I run into others who know that. Thanks Shule...you made my day!

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

I always suspected that the 3,000 oil change recomndation was off as my oil always looked clean tthen, difficult to read the level even, so i usually go about 5,000 miles before changing it. I'm going to check my Chevy owner's manual.

The last vessel I was the PIC on held 60,000 barrels. 1 barrel = 42 gals., so that's a 2,520,000 capacity divided into the 284.5 mil. gals saved....that's close to 113 barge Rhode Islands full of oil. It's difficult, but I can visualize that better than most people, and that is a s.it-load of oil saved each year! Thanks all this adds up up to a better world.

Luckily my calculator works, so I could save my brain....might be screwed when it goes down tho. ;-)

~Odin~

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

That's a boatload of oil! heheheh. Sorry Odin, couldn't resist.

Although I agree somewhat with Narley that we'll never get everyone on board the idea, isn't that the case with most the ideas that get posted here? And that's not the point really since few, if any, of our ideas will be universally accepted, at least in the short term. It's all about putting small ideas into perspective. How a small change here and there can add up in the long run.

In my post, I mention "if half the cars" on the road did this. Hell, if one one-hundredth started doing this, it still adds up to 2.845 million gallons of oil and 91.75 million dollars in our pockets, still quite a significant amount.

Hey wait, you're agreeing with me so perhaps I should've addressed this to him, lol! Hey, Narley, are you listening? Don't make me repeat myself! (just kiddin')

Hey, get one of those solar powered calculators. The one I had worked just off the light from the lamp on my desk. Quite handy. Never needed to change batteries.

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

No idea that shows RESISTANCE to the corrupt system that we all live under is too small. Yes it's 113 boatloads of oil. ;-)

I remember the first calculator that we had on the boats. There are no more dummies here because we have the Bowmar Brain now.

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

"No idea too small." Exactly right. People need to be a little more receptive. Too many have resigned themselves to the idea that "it won't work" for one reason or another.

What's the "Bowmar Brain?" (I'll be logging off in a minute, but had to ask, so I probably won't be replying until tomorrow. Besides, it's a clever way of me bumping my thread back up tomorrow, heheheh. Talk to you then)

[-] 3 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Many people live their lives in negativism. Knowing someone who suffered with depression, I resoved myself at an early age to stay positive. One of my favorite sayings is, "The difference between ordeal, and adventure is atttude." unknown That 'attitude' has worked well for me with things like hitch-hiking alone cross-country and then through the Aussie outback, and especially with having over-come (so far ;-) some serious health issues. One of the atributes that is found a lot in centurians is their ability to overcome adversity. To be honest, if serious harm came to a loved one, that would be a test that i don't know if i could pass. Anyway being positive is also working well in the struggle that we find ourselves in now.

The Bowmar Brain was one of the first widely-available hand-held calculators, and if i remember right, it cost $120 in the early 70s. The guy i worked with got one, but i think the company reimbersed him. Later in my career, I worked with gross barrels, net barrels, US gallons and metric tons, so i was glad we had them, calculators that is.

When you bump up this thread, give mine a bump too as i think it is dying a quick death. It's a bitch when you don't put up a thread for a long time, then when you do, it dies. It is a good lesson in humility though.

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Yes, negativism is detrimental and ultimately self-defeating. As someone who's had my fair share of bumps in the road I find myself succumbing to it at times, but try to stay positive as much as possible given my present situation (admittedly largely my fault).

I'll go hunt down your thread. I didn't have a chance to read it last night. Oh wait, I know where it is (in the PM! heheheh).

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

You have to fight negativism sometimes, but mostly for me, i think it just means going right into the solution mode to a problem, then act on it trying to get the best possible results.

Being immature, and unaware of your problems helps to keep you positive too. lol

~Odin

[-] 0 points by OTP (-203) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

Its tough when the reality of the situation is so dire, the things that happened to cause it go against everything we were told this country was about, and the solutions needed require more action than the general population is showing it has a will for.

[-] 2 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Your right of course, and I really feel that negativism in Chris Hedges' writing, and I respect him very much. Sometimes it comes out in mine too.... but your not helping anyone, especiallly yourself by dwelling in negativism. The one consolation we have is: If it all comes crashing down, we will know that we were there trying to avert it, and then we go on if we are able.

~Odin~

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

All good points.

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Thanks, it's not much of a consolation, but it's all we have....knowing that we did our part.

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by Narley (535) 1 year ago

You may be right about saving money. But most people won’t stop changing their oil. They will not risk damaging the engine in they’re cars. A lot of people even use high priced and unneeded synthetic oil because they’ve been told it lasts longer, and they still change the oil every 3000 miles.

I think you’re right, but the idea won’t catch on.

[-] -1 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

I'm assuming when you say "most people won't stop changing their oil" you mean "they won't stop changing their oil as often," correct?

[-] 1 points by Narley (535) 1 year ago

Yes, meaning not changing as often. We are a car culture, and cars are normally the second most expensive thing people buy (a house being the most expensive). I just don't see people doing anything that may lessen the life of their car.

.

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Tell ya what - get an oil change - pull the dipstick and look at the oil on it - take some of that oil off of the dipstick and rub it between your fingers - now go to the store and get some z-max oil additive and pour it into your crankcase - now once every thousand miles or so check your oil again - just like you did when you just had it changed - notice much difference? Burnt oil or oil loaded with carbon will be black - what color is your oil? Is it watery? or is it thicker then water - like when the oil was fresh - how does it feel rubbed between your fingers?

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

We do the "gap test" on oil.

Wipe the dipstick between your finger and thumb. Slowly open a gap between these two digits. If the oil separates before 1/4 inch, or 6 mm, time for a change.

We do an average of 10,000 kms, (about 6,000 miles) between oil changes, and most would say that Australian conditions are generally harsher than US road conditions. The first Ford imported into Australia literally fell apart in short order, and it took several major suspension and chassis improvements, and a round Australia trip or two to get people interested in Fords again.

So, yeah, the 3,000 mile thing is bogus for sure.

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Agreed, common sense goes a long way. You gotta remember to wash your hands before you have a sandwich though. ;-)

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

What - hydrocarbons are not a fancy carbohydrate?

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

No....olive oil, OK! I remember hearing a guy tell me that every time the new crew ....that replaced the crew getting off of the tanker he worked on.... there was a meatloaf that he had prepared for the replacement crew. Finally one of the guys said to him that was really nice, but why do you make that for us all the time? He said, it was the only way he could get his hands clean before going home!! So if you run out of hand cleaner DK...use chopped meat. lol

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

ewwwww - damn now I want meatloaf.

[-] -1 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

ewwwww - damn, I just had meatloaf. Honestly.

I know it might just be another 'urban legend,' but I remember hearing years ago that some Oriental restaurants use engine oil instead of cooking oil because it has so much higher a flash point than cooking oil, so they could keep the flame going full-blast without the food actually catching fire. It's probably bullshit, but considering the aftertaste of a couple meals I've had at some of their restaurants . . . .

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Ummm yeah I think you would know that something was up - that beautiful aroma bouquet - so reminiscent of a V8 with leaky rings. {;-])

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Heheheheh. But you know what, DK? I'm completely serious about the aftertaste a couple times, although it could have been something else. But it did seem awfully . . . . 10w40ish. :-)

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Ick - did you get sick? Was it fish? I have had some funky tasting fish before - but not with a pleasing 10W-30 aroma.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Nah, didn't get sick. But I was much younger and healthier. It's been so long I don't remember what it was, but it wasn't fish. Well, it could've been shrimp. By the way, I haven't eaten at an Oriental restaurant in at least 20 years.

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Yep Exxon - Alaska - mess still there.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Damn! Although I'm not surprised. It also means the mess in the Gulf will likewise never be fully cleaned up. The whole Big Oil industry needs a serious 'wake-up' call, although I don't see that even being possible, considering the huge scope of the problem. They're probably the most powerful non-military entity on the planet. Definitely the richest, by far. If my OP was implemented 100%, it wouldn't even put a dent in it. Although as I pointed out, the money put into the public's pocket, and therefore the US economy would make a difference. Unless they spent it all on iPhones and WalMart.

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

That mess has never been cleaned up - they still got stuff being washed up and if you are on the beach and dig down through the rocks a couple of inches - you run into crude.


[-] 1 points by gnomunny (4058) from St Louis, MO 0 minutes ago

I was kidding about the coinciding incidents, but have to agree. Those bastards! ↥twinkle ↧stinkle permalink

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Are you talking about Exxon Valdez? I'm sure the Gulf hasn't been cleaned up. The entire BP management should've gone to prison for crimes against humanity. I heard the Gulf incident wasn't the first BP disaster either, I think there was one in either the Middle East or North Sea that was pretty well covered up. And I don't mean cleaned up. I mean covered up, as in documents destroyed, etc. before the Gulf incident, meaning they knew they had a problem with the technology but chose to ignore it for, . . . uh, lemme think about the reason for a minute. It seems to have escaped me for some reason <sarcasm alert>.

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Those Bastards.


[-] 1 points by gnomunny (4058) from St Louis, MO 2 minutes ago

Now that you mention it, my experiences may have coincided with Exxon Valdez! . . . . :-) ↥twinkle ↧stinkle permalink

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

I was kidding about the coinciding incidents, but have to agree. Those bastards!

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

Yeah - I can understand that - the last time leaving a bad taste in your mouth. I have run into funky seafood before - but from various sources - mostly store bought. Taste - Ick? - WTF - Garbage - several years later - ah I have a craving - cross the fingers. Wonder how lovely the BP Gulf of Mexico coastal sea food is?

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Now that you mention it, my experiences may have coincided with Exxon Valdez! . . . . :-)

[-] 1 points by Narley (535) 1 year ago

You are right of course. I’m a shade tree mechanic. Meaning I do the things on my vehicles that don’t require a computer diagnostic. I change my own oil, do brake jobs, change plugs, etc.. . But my point is you’ll won’t be able to get the masses to do it. Most people won’t even check tire pressure. They’ll ruin a set of tires before doing anything themselves.

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

True the "masses" need to do better with maintaing their cars, but have you ever noticed that the people that are good at working on their cars...always seem to be working on them? What's up with that?

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by Narley (535) 1 year ago

I think some people just enjoy working on cars. Remember cars were the cool thing just a few years ago. Not so much now. There was a time, not too long ago, when the average car owner could do everything on a car without needing expensive electronic equipment. Cars these days are just computers with wheels. As a teen I did some drag racing; and me and my friends did all the work to keep it running strong. I think I still have a timing light stashed around somewhere.

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

When I was a kid, my dream was to have myself a Pontiac with dual exhaust, and several carbuerators. Never did get one, but i always apprecaite seeing them in vintage car shows. I used to watch drag races with a friend that happened in front of my house in the NJ pine barrens on Friday and Saturday nights. By the time i got to be old enought to drive, it was a VW for me, and other stuff I can't mention here. Today it's computers and games.

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by Narley (535) 1 year ago

Nothing wrong with a good old VW Beetle. I’ve owned two of them in my life. I don’t know for sure, but I think they were the bestselling car ever made. In South America and Mexico they are still very popular. I remember when you could buy a brand new one for $1800. Wish I had one.

[-] 1 points by frovikleka (2563) from Island Heights, NJ 1 year ago

Yes, my sister paid about $1,800 for her '70 VW, and i paid around $2,300 for my '72. They were great cars except for going up steep hills, although putting on the header made a big difference in power. With the engine in the back and rear wheel drive, they were really good in the sandy trails that went through the pines. Even the cops could not follow us, which came in handy a couple of times. ;-)

I always felt a bit guilty anud hypocritical telling my teen-age kids that they had to behave, knowing that I too had some youthful indiscretions.

~Odin~

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (27542) from Coon Rapids, MN 1 year ago

True - you will not get the masses to try it - well - not without special attention and education given them 1st.

BTW - I am not right "of course" - If you have not already done this - then you should withhold opinion till you do.

If you do it for the 1st time? Run a motor flush prior to changing the oil.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (6287) from St Louis, MO 1 year ago

Well, like I'm trying to tell people, the 3000 mile oil change is a scam. Google it and see how many pages come up. They will concur with what I've stated here. And for the record, although I'm not a mechanic per se, I've driven professionally for over twelve years, always do my own engine work (and trans, and suspension), work on cars for extra cash, and have owned somewhere around twenty five cars and trucks of various makes and models over the years and have NEVER ruined an engine (although I have abused the hell out of a few in my younger days). Not trying to brag, Narley, but I do know a wee bit about cars. I guarantee you it's a scam, and you seem like of of the millions that have been taken in by it, no offense. Like I state in the post, if in doubt follow the owner's manual not the 3000 mile oil change myth. Do that and I guarantee you will not ruin your engine.

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