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Retribution Against the Financial Elite!

Today: No Apologies! #Manning Sentencing Protests

Posted 8 months ago on Aug. 21, 2013, 12:02 p.m. EST by OccupyWallSt
Tags: manning

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Today, Pfc. Manning was sentenced to 35 years in military prison for the heroic act of exposing US war crimes. The following is a list of #Manning protests happening this afternoon and evening:

For more info:

20 Comments

20 Comments


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[-] 4 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

Speak Truth to Government = YOU ARE WRONG IN SO MANY WAYS & YOUR MISTREATMENT OF Bradley Manning Is Only ONE

[-] 5 points by shadz66 (17898) 8 months ago

By Bradley Manning : ‘Sometimes You Have to Pay a Heavy Price to Live in a Free Society’,

The following is a transcript of the statement made by Pfc. Bradley Manning as read by David Coombs at a press conference on Wednesday 21st Aug. 2013

~

The decisions that I made in 2010 were made out of a concern for my country and the world that we live in. Since the tragic events of 9/11, our country has been at war. We’ve been at war with an enemy that chooses not to meet us on any traditional battlefield, and due to this fact we’ve had to alter our methods of combating the risks posed to us and our way of life.

I initially agreed with these methods and chose to volunteer to help defend my country. It was not until I was in Iraq and reading secret military reports on a daily basis that I started to question the morality of what we were doing. It was at this time I realized in our efforts to meet this risk posed to us by the enemy, we have forgotten our humanity. We consciously elected to devalue human life both in Iraq and Afghanistan. When we engaged those that we perceived were the enemy, we sometimes killed innocent civilians. Whenever we killed innocent civilians, instead of accepting responsibility for our conduct, we elected to hide behind the veil of national security and classified information in order to avoid any public accountability.

In our zeal to kill the enemy, we internally debated the definition of torture. We held individuals at Guantanamo for years without due process. We inexplicably turned a blind eye to torture and executions by the Iraqi government. And we stomached countless other acts in the name of our war on terror.

Patriotism is often the cry extolled when morally questionable acts are advocated by those in power. When these cries of patriotism drown our any logically based intentions [unclear], it is usually an American soldier that is ordered to carry out some ill-conceived mission.

Our nation has had similar dark moments for the virtues of democracy - the Trail of Tears, the Dred Scott decision, McCarthyism, the Japanese-American internment camps - to name a few. I am confident that many of our actions since 9/11 will one day be viewed in a similar light.

As the late Howard Zinn once said, “There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people.”

I understand that my actions violated the law, and I regret if my actions hurt anyone or harmed the United States. It was never my intention to hurt anyone. I only wanted to help people. When I chose to disclose classified information, I did so out of a love for my country and a sense of duty to others.

If you deny my request for a pardon, I will serve my time knowing that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society. I will gladly pay that price if it means we could have country that is truly conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all women and men are created equal.

~

e tenebris, lux ...

[Copied verbatim under 'Fair Use' from : http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article35929.htm - please 'tweet' ; share on f-b / social media and e-mail this link as widely as possible to honour BM]

[-] 3 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

BTW - thanks - and - TWEET

DKAtoday ‏@DKAtoday

Bradley Manning - ‘Sometimes You Have to Pay a Heavy Price to Live in a Free Society’ http://j.mp/1bV6jdk

Sucks that it is in the USA.

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[-] 2 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 8 months ago

911 hardly a good definition for the country

this whole war on terror/communism is crap

the united states was not hurt by Manning's actions

[-] 2 points by shadz66 (17898) 8 months ago

''The NSA : ‘The Abyss from Which There Is No Return’'', by John W. Whitehead :

  • http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article35919.htm from which ...

  • “The National Security Agency’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything: telephone conversations, telegrams, it doesn’t matter. There would be no place to hide. If a dictator ever took over, the N.S.A. could enable it to impose total tyranny, and there would be no way to fight back.” — Senator Frank Church (1975)

''We now find ourselves operating in a strange paradigm where the government not only views the citizenry as suspects but treats them as suspects, as well. Thus, the news that the National Security Agency (NSA) is routinely operating outside of the law and overstepping its legal authority by carrying out surveillance on American citizens is not really much of a surprise. This is what happens when you give the government broad powers and allow government agencies to routinely sidestep the Constitution.''

Sadly Matt, tho' I shall refrain from extended comment and explanation, 9/!! is a rather good analogy of reality in The U$A re. 'appearances over actualities and received reasons over realities'. War IS crap and is all too often based on lies and money. Finally, further to your comment, I append and recommend :

''Comparisons between WikiLeaks and the Pentagon Papers cases raise very serious questions about government and judicial discretion.''

multum in parvo ...

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

Patriotism is often the cry extolled when morally questionable acts are advocated by those in power. When these cries of patriotism drown our any logically based intentions [unclear], it is usually an American soldier that is ordered to carry out some ill-conceived mission.

Hhmmmm a well known individual and conflict come to mind ( I know I know - obvious - but THAT is the point - it is an obvious appropriate comparison ) - Hitler & WWII.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

In our zeal to kill the enemy, we internally debated the definition of torture. We held individuals at Guantanamo for years without due process. We inexplicably turned a blind eye to torture and executions by the Iraqi government. And we stomached countless other acts in the name of our war on terror or even a combatant.

Justifying the use of terror ( extreme measures ) in the fight against terror - never mind that this is done on civilians who for the most part have not been caught in the act of doing anything to be convicted of anything that would label them a terrorist.

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[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

When we engaged those that we perceived were the enemy, we sometimes killed innocent civilians. Whenever we killed innocent civilians, instead of accepting responsibility for our conduct, we elected to hide behind the veil of national security and classified information in order to avoid any public accountability.

And we know that that just is not good for the war effort or the politicians pushing it - look at the hell raised in Vietnam over the killing of innocents - we certainly don't want to see a repeat of that - so - keep that hidden/secret.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

I initially agreed with these methods and chose to volunteer to help defend my country. It was not until I was in Iraq and reading secret military reports on a daily basis that I started to question the morality of what we were doing. It was at this time I realized in our efforts to meet this risk posed to us by the enemy, we have forgotten our humanity.

Initially = Prior to finding out that this job was requiring that crimes be hidden. Not information dangerous to the troops if it got out - well not to the innocent troops anyway - just dangerous to the troops and their officers ( and those instructing/ordering those officers ) engaging in criminal behavior.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

The decisions that I made in 2010 were made out of a concern for my country and the world that we live in. Since the tragic events of 9/11, our country has been at war. We’ve been at war with an enemy that chooses not to meet us on any traditional battlefield, and due to this fact we’ve had to alter our methods of combating the risks posed to us and our way of life.

Hhmmmmm..............WallStreet and other major Corp(se)oRATions and their government lackeys?

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[-] 2 points by Renneye (3166) 8 months ago

Historic words, if ever I heard them.

Bradley Manning personifies bravery ~

Thanks Shadz.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

Historic words, if ever I heard them.

Yes - so let us win that they will hit the history books - winners write history.

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[-] 3 points by shadz66 (17898) 8 months ago

''America cares for you - until you start asking questions'', by Gary Younge :

''Manning, Snowden and Trayvon Martin : a series of legal cases is making US citizens re-evaluate what the state is really for.''

Solidarity @ Bradley Manning & http://www.bradleymanning.org/ .

multum in parvo ...

[-] 3 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

BTW - TWEET

DKAtoday ‏@DKAtoday

Today: No Apologies! #Manning Sentencing Protests http://occupywallst.org/article/today-no-apologies-manning-sentencing-protests/#.UhUfLmFaIYI.twitter

Speak Truth to Government = YOU ARE WRONG

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[-] 2 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 8 months ago

the emperor wears no clothes

[-] 1 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 8 months ago

Miranda - IRONIC ?

Tell the UK: Stop the war on journalists

The petition to Sir Peter Westmacott, the British Ambassador to the U.S. Philip Barton, Deputy Head of Mission to the U.S., and Major General Buster Howes, the Defence Attache to the U.S. reads: "Journalists are not terrorists. Abusing "anti-terror" laws to detain the family members of journalists is unacceptable. As Americans, we ask that your country stop intimidating and harassing journalists investigating the NSA's unconstitutional domestic spying programs which also violate the privacy rights of UK citizens."

Automatically add your name: Sign the petition ►

Stop the war on journalists — click here to take action.

It's outrageous and profoundly chilling. British authorities detained the partner of Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who broke the NSA spying scandal by publishing documents from the whistleblower Edward Snowden in the UK's Guardian newspaper.

David Miranda was flying to the home he shares in Brazil with journalist Glenn Greenwald after visiting Laura Poitras in Berlin. Poitras, an American filmmaker, has been working with Greenwald to produce reporting on the NSA's secret domestic spying programs. He was carrying flash drives containing documents that were part of the investigative reporting by Greenwald and Poitras.1

Normally British authorities need probable cause to detain someone for hours at Heathrow airport in London, deny them access to an attorney and confiscate their belongings. But not if they say you are suspected of being involved in terrorism.

That's just what happened to Miranda. He was detained under Schedule 7 of the British Terrorism Act and held for nearly nine hours -- the maximum allowed without levying charges. When anti-terrorism powers are invoked, Schedule 7 allows British authorities to stop and search anyone without warrant or reasonable suspicion. Miranda was eventually released but his cellphone, flash drives and computers were confiscated.

Tell the UK: Journalists are not terrorists. Detaining their family members is unacceptable. Click here to automatically sign the petition.

Said Greenwald in reaction, "This is obviously a rather profound escalation of their attacks on the news-gathering process and journalism. It's bad enough to prosecute and imprison sources. It's worse still to imprison journalists who report the truth. But to start detaining the family members and loved ones of journalists is simply despotic."2

The New York Times reports that Miranda was carrying as of yet unpublished documents from the Snowden trove of NSA evidence from Poitras back to Greenwald. He was clearly not targeted because he was a suspected terrorist -- but rather because he was linked to investigative journalists working to expose the unconstitutional spying programs at NSA. But he was detained under a law intended to stop terrorism -- a law that permits authorities to deny him access to a lawyer and take his possessions without a court order.

In the wake of the incident, Amnesty International charged, "It is utterly improbable that David Michael Miranda, a Brazilian national transiting through London, was detained at random, given the role his partner has played in revealing the truth about the unlawful nature of NSA surveillance… The only possible intent behind this detention was to harass him and his partner, Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, for his role in analyzing the data released by Edward Snowden."3

Tell the UK: Journalists are not terrorists. Stop the war on journalists. Click here to automatically sign the petition.

This is not an isolated incident. There is an escalating war on journalists and whistleblowers in the U.S. who are increasingly threatened with prosecution by the current administration for investigating the executive branch. 4 And now the British authorities are taking a leading role by using anti-terror laws to suppress the exercise of a free press.

The uncovering of a far-reaching domestic spy operation only underscores the need for a strong and independent press to help expose abuses of power at the highest levels of our government and give the public the information we need to hold our government accountable to the Constitution.

It should never be allowed in a democracy to use the security apparatus to intimidate and harass a journalist investigating government abuse. And the UK's targeting of a journalist's spouse under the guise of an anti-terrorism investigation is clearly an escalation of the security state's war on journalism.

Americans need to send a direct message to British officials who may be acting in coordination with U.S. military and intelligence agencies that this is unacceptable. We'll deliver your signatures directly to Sir Peter Westmacott, the British Ambassador to the U.S., Philip Barton, Deputy Head of Mission to the U.S., and Major General Buster Howes, the Defence Attache to the U.S. at the British embassy in Washington, DC.

Thank you for standing up for a free and independent press.

Becky Bond, Politcal Director CREDO Action from Working Assets

Automatically add your name: Sign the petition ►

Learn more about this campaign

  1. "Britain Detains the Partner of a Reporter Tied to Leaks," New York Times, August 18, 2013

  2. " Detaining my partner was a failed attempt at intimidation," Glenn Greenwald, The Guardian, August 18, 2013

  3. " Glenn Greenwald's partner detained at Heathrow airport for nine hours," The Guardian, August 18, 2013

  4. "Climate of Fear: Jim Risen v. the Obama administration," Glenn Greenwald, Salon.com, June 23, 2011

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© 2013 CREDO. All rights reserved.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (21783) 8 months ago

Hell, yeah.

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[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (21783) 8 months ago

You're a person of rare intelligence. It's rare when you show any.

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (21783) 8 months ago

A little kid gets on a city bus, sits right behind the driver, and starts talking loudly, "If my dad was a bull and my mom a cow, I'd be a little bull."

The driver gets annoyed as the kids continues to yammer on. "If my dad was an rooster and my mom a hen, I would be a little chick."

The kid goes on and on with all the animals he knows, when finally, the bus driver yells, "What if your dad was a bum and your mom was a drunk?"

The kid smiles and says, "I'd be a bus driver."

[-] 0 points by Toynbee (656) from Savannah, GA 8 months ago

Manning is a distraction to the real issues. Namely, economic and social justice. The shrinking middle class. Growing number of children living in poverty. Corporate leaders who have still not been prosecuted for the misdeeds that produced the 2008 meltdown and subsequent global malaise.

Manning is no hero.

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